Choosing DNS Servers

Every once in a while (it doesn’t happen very often) DNS servers would stop resolving certain domains causing intermittent issues when accessing the Internet. To solve the DNS issues, I often switch DNS servers on my main router. Changing DNS servers may require rebooting your router.

So, here’s a list of DNS servers you could use on your router, in case the current DNS servers you are using is having problems. I primarily use OpenDNS and Google DNS servers, but others DNS servers are reliable as well.

OpenDNS

208.67.222.222 Primary
208.67.220.220 Secondary

Google

8.8.8.8 Primary
8.8.4.4 Secondary

Comcast

75.75.75.75 Primary
75.75.76.76 Secondary

AT&T DSL

68.94.156.1 Primary
68.94.157.1 Secondary

UltraDNS

156.154.70.1 Primary
156.154.71.1 Secondary

ScrubIt

67.138.54.100 Primary
207.225.209.66 Secondary

DNSResolvers

205.210.42.205 Primary
64.68.200.200 Secondary

Can’t Connect To MySQL Server

I recently had a problem with an Ubuntu server that was running MySQL. None of my applications were connecting to the database. After poking around in the server, I realized the database doesn’t seem to be running at all. I tried restarting it from the Terminal, but I ran into this error message.

ERROR 2003 (HY000): Can't connect to MySQL server on '10.10.10.110' (111)

As it turns out, the Ubuntu server picked up a new IP address of 10.10.10.113 from the last reboot. I went ahead and assigned a static IP address to the server of 10.10.10.200. I should have done it initially when I setup the server. If you need help setting up a static IP address on the Ubuntu server, here are the instructions on how to set Ubuntu server to static IP address.

I looked at the MySQL configuration file called /etc/mysql/my.cnf, the bind-address was manually set to the old IP address of 10.10.10.110. So, edited the file and entered the new IP address of 10.10.10.200.

bind-address = 10.10.10.200

Finally, I restarted the network as well as started the MySQL server.

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql start

Everything is hunky dory again.